Hivos International

BIG Voices in small spaces: A report of the public survey on the role of media in promoting transparency and accountability

The Kenya Media Programme (KMP) envisages a second four-year phase effective April 2015 and hopes to address sector wide efforts and challenges faced by the media. This is part of the reason why it was necessary to undertake a national public survey to establish how effective the media is in improving transparency and accountability in Kenya.

The outcome of this research which was undertaken between March 9-18, 2015, will help demonstrate KMP’s impact and how the programme has performed against its revised framework. A total of 1,428 respondents (718 males and 710 females) were interviewed from a sample of 32 counties countrywide. Most of the respondents were under the age of 55 years with 19% of the age 18-24years,
26% of the age 25-29years, 20% between 30-34 years and 14% between 35-39 years of age. The sample design of 1,428 respondents was based on a clustered, stratified, multi-stage, probability sample design. This ensured that every individual is given equal and known chance of being included in the sample. As a result, the survey outcome provides an unbiased estimate of the views of the national target population.

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