Hivos International

Renewable Energy

Why civil society’s contribution is crucial in ensuring energy access for all

Looking back on my overwhelming first time attending a Council of the Parties (COP) at COP22 in Marrakech last November, it was filled with so many meetings, side panels, negotiations and networking opportunities that it was easy to overlook the real people affected by lack of access to energy. Acronyms were flying all over the place, COP veterans sped past us newbies to get to the next negotiation session for LTF – that’s long-term climate finance to you and me – and  little huddles of people speaking in a truly foreign language (COP-lingo) were gathered outside every meeting room and ever

You can almost see nothing inside the Manyatta (a home, often temporary of the Maasai/Samburu people). The window and only ventilation is the size of two adult hands. There is fire burning probably to keep the place lit up and warm given it is a rainy day. Even with the choking darkness one cannot fail to notice the hanging soot from the mud ceiling. At night, our host, Grace Malipe uses a kerosene wick. She has four children in school and this is their source of light as they go about their homework.

Zimbabwe's Minister of Energy and Power Development, Samuel Undenge, recently announced at the 48th Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) meeting in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe that the region will add 30 000 MW to the region between 2017 and 2022.

Harnessing Zimbabwe's abundant renewable energy resources is key to helping the country support its development strategies and leapfrog towards low-carbon socio-economic progress.

If Women Stop, Power Stops

When we talk about energy we tend to think about cables, megawatts and engineering. But energy is something simpler and more vital than that. According to the Spanish Language Usage Dictionary compiled by Maria Moliner, energy means "greater or lesser ability of someone or something to perform a task, an effort, or produce an effect."

Sub-Saharan Africa alone has been more vulnerable to the effects of climate change more than ever. The Intergovernmental panel on climate change predicts that by 2020, crop yields may fall up to 50 per cent and 75-250 million people could be affected by increased water shortages. This poses a significant risk for the generations to come and deny them valuable environmental resources such as clean air and food.

Baca postingan blog dalam Bahasa Indonesia

“If you want to see how 100% renewable energy has been put into practice in the field, please take a look yourself in my village in Sumba, Indonesia. Everyone who comes today is welcome”, said Umbu Janji. He made his invitation to the appreciative laughter and applause of participants at the international conference “100% Renewable Energy for 1.5 Degrees” at COP22 in Morocco, last week.

(Note: the Green Climate Fund Board is meeting from 12 – 14 October 2016 Quito, Ecuador)

The fact our planet’s climate has been affected beyond repair by human intervention is one of the most thoroughly researched and well-established scientific findings of all time. If we are to even partially avoid crippling future generations with debts and dangerously degraded environments, then we need thorough action as soon as possible. A solution was sought in the first-ever universal, legally binding global climate deal within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

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