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Citizenship rights for ethnic minorities in Turkey: The case of Kurds

It is a well-known fact that extension of universal citizenship rights to all citizens regardless of their socio-economic status, were considered as a feature of the progress of modern societies. This approach is widely contested in 1980s due to the growth of social movements which challenge the traditional form of citizenship. The main theme in these movements were/are differences of gender,...

Civic driven change: A narrative to bring politics back into civil society discourse

Politics is central to development discourse, yet remains peripheral. And, over some twenty years, a civil society narrative has not fulfilled its potential to ‘bring politics back in’. Reasons can be found in conceptual confusion, in selectivity in donor thinking and policies towards civil society and in the growth-driven political economy of NGO-ism.

In this paper, Alan Fowler and...

Moving targets: Notes on social movements

Are we entering a post-NGO era in development? Aid critics very much  suggest so. Hailed as a magic bullet for development two decades ago,  NGOs are increasingly criticized for being ineffective agents of change,  out of touch with broader social currents in society and operating in a  fragmented way. Under pressure to show results, NGOs and their donors  are increasingly attempting to align...

The dynamics of NGO collaboration

Are we entering a post-NGO era in development? Aid critics very much  suggest so. Hailed as a magic bullet for development two decades ago,  NGOs are increasingly criticized for being ineffective agents of change,  out of touch with broader social currents in society and operating in a  fragmented way. Under pressure to show results, NGOs and their donors  are increasingly attempting to align...

Civic Driven Change: Organizing civic action

This policy brief explores the emergence of organizing as a method of citizen action for change, as it differs from mobilizing and other approaches to problem-solving. The focus of organizing is on developing civic agency as a central element of work on concrete issues. Civic agency is defined as capacities for self-directed collective action in open settings with no predetermined outcomes but...

Civic Driven Change: Implications for aided development

This essay summarizes the features of civic driven change emerging from the essays that could give value to the being and doing of private aid agencies. It then focuses on the ‘Monday morning’ question of steps that agencies can take to consider adopting a CDC discourse and approach and types of measures that would help with strategy and practical implementation.

Civic Driven Change and developmental democracy

Examples, mainly from the United States, show that public work can be an effective and practical way of expanding civic agency and engaging with political systems. Theses experiences are applied to defining and pursuing forms of democracy that are ‘developmental’ in that they build citizen capability to act against creeping technocracy and party-based politics that disempower.

Civic Driven Change: of the law and the role of outsiders

Outsiders promote civic driven change in ways that implicitly assume and try to create a preferred relationship between personal and public rights and responsibilities. Drawing on cases from Hungary, this essay critically debates the role of external agencies and their political projects in defining and steering civic agency in other countries.

Civic Driven Change: Spirituality, religion and faith

Values are a significant feature of civic driven change. This essay explores the role of religion in shaping the moral norms that guide people’s behaviour towards citizenship, politics and authority. With Kenya as an example, the notion of a rigorous divide between secular and spiritual groundings of civic agency is questioned.

The Zimbabwe women's movement 1995-2000

Did Zimbabwean women’s organising constitute a women’s movement during the years 1995 – 2000? In a fascinating account of a significant period of women’s collective organising, Shereen Essof’s response to this question is positive. As a feminist scholar she interrogates the period during which she was a more than full-time woman activist out and about in Zimbabwe. Inspired by the vision of...

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